Careers: Web Developer

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Careers: Web Developer is a high-interest reading comprehension lesson that allows students to practice grade-appropriate reading comprehension, foundational reading, and reading fluency skills. These reading comprehension lessons are designed to be completed in one or two class settings.

Each lesson discusses a subject that students want to read about and that teachers will want to incorporate into their reading instruction. The lesson is appropriate as a whole-class, stand-alone lesson or as an independent small-group activity. Be sure to check if there is a Learn Bright video that goes with this lesson!

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Description

What our Careers: Web Developer lesson plan includes

Lesson Objectives and Overview: Careers: Web Developer is a high-interest reading comprehension lesson plan. As such, students will practice various close reading and comprehension skills. In addition, they will learn about the ANIMAL habitat, diet, and behaviors. This lesson is for students in 3rd grade, 4th grade, and 5th grade.

Classroom Procedure

Every lesson plan provides you with a classroom procedure page that outlines a step-by-step guide to follow. You do not have to follow the guide exactly. The guide helps you organize the lesson and details when to hand out worksheets. It also lists information in the yellow box that you might find useful. You will find the lesson objectives, state standards, and number of class sessions the lesson should take to complete in this area. In addition, it describes the supplies you will need as well as what and how you need to prepare beforehand.

Teacher Notes

The paragraph on this page provides a little more information or guidance on what to expect from the lesson. It explains that you can teach this lesson in a whole-class setting or as an independent, small-group activity. You can use the blank lines to record any thoughts or ideas you have as you prepare.

CAREERS: WEB DEVELOPER LESSON PLAN CONTENT PAGES

What’s a Web Developer?

The Careers: Web Developer lesson plan contains three content pages. 1You might be wondering what a web developer is. How are they different from computer programmers? Maybe you’re just starting to navigate the digital world. And you think that a career using computers might be fun. It’s never too early to begin exploring the possibilities of a career in web development. Now is the perfect time to delve into coding and design.

Have you ever thought about your favorite websites? Are they super cool? Are they easy to use? Do you like how fun apps look on your phone? Then you have an idea of what web developers do! Web developers build websites that make it easy for us to do stuff online, like play games. They work with web designers to bring their vision to life!

What They Do

Web developers get to do all sorts of cool stuff. Similar to computer programmers, they use their computer skills to write special codes for websites and apps. The codes tell the website or app what to do. Sometimes, developers work with a team to brainstorm how websites should look. They build the features websites should have, and the designers work on how it looks to end users. Web developers also fix problems, like when a button on a website doesn’t work or an app crashes.

Imagine a world without web developers. We wouldn’t have websites, for one thing. There would be no exciting games to play online. Do you like funny videos? There wouldn’t be any of those either. We couldn’t learn cool things from educational websites or explore virtual worlds in our favorite apps. And we wouldn’t have helpful tools like online maps and calculators.

What to Expect as a Web Developer

In the United States alone, there are millions of web developers. The demand for their skills is only expected to grow as technology advances. Most businesses sell their products online. Web developers are super important because they help these companies increase their online sales with a website. They make shopping easier for us, too. And they think up new creative ways to make the internet even more awesome!

What does this mean for you? Well, for starters, it means that a career in web development can lead to exciting opportunities and financial stability. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for web developers is $77,200. And as the demand for them continues to rise, so will their earning potential.

Just like any profession, it’s essential to consider the long-term prospects before diving in. When it comes to web development, the future is very bright. The need for skilled web developers will only intensify as new digital trends emerge. Web developers are like chameleons. They adapt to the ever-changing environment of technology and design trends.

Web development offers a chance to make a real impact in the digital world. You might work on a project creating accessible websites for people with disabilities. You can also develop user-friendly interfaces for education. Web developers improve online experiences for anyone who interacts with the digital world!

How to Become a Web Developer

What does it take to become a web developer? Well, it all starts with a passion for coding and design. While a high school diploma is the minimum requirement, most web developers pursue a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information technology, or a related field. Many supplement their education with online courses, coding boot camps, or self-directed learning to stay up-to-date with the latest technologies and techniques. You must like math and science. You should be artistic and have a flair for creative design since you’ll work with web designers a lot.

In addition to formal education, web developers gain practical experience through internships, freelance projects, or entry-level positions. Many begin as gamers or in e-sports. This hands-on training is invaluable for honing their skills, building their portfolios, and establishing themselves in the competitive field of web development.

A career in web development offers a unique blend of creativity, innovation, and opportunity. If you’re passionate about building things with code and making a difference in the digital world, consider becoming a web developer. Who knows? You might just create the next groundbreaking website!

CAREERS: WEB DEVELOPER LESSON PLAN WORKSHEETS

The Careers: Web Developer lesson plan includes two worksheets: an activity worksheet and a practice worksheet. Each one will help students solidify their grasp of the material they learned throughout the lesson. You can refer to the classroom procedure guidelines to know when to hand out each worksheet.

DESIGN A WEBSITE ACTIVITY WORKSHEET

For the activity, students will pretend they have to design a website they’ve developed. They will use the storyboard to plan out the design and decide what they want the website to be about. Once they complete the storyboard, they will answer the questions on the first activity page.

CAREERS: WEB DEVELOPER PRACTICE WORKSHEET

The practice worksheet lists 10 questions based on the content. These questions all relate to the content pages, so students will need to refer to them often for the answers. In addition, each question provides which reading tool the question corresponds to, such as text feature, vocabulary, or comprehension.

Worksheet Answer Keys

At the end of the lesson plan document is an answer key for the practice worksheet. The correct answers are all in red to make it easier for you to compare them with students’ responses. If you choose to administer the lesson pages to your students via PDF, you will need to save a new file that omits these pages. Otherwise, you can simply print out the applicable pages and keep these as reference for yourself when grading assignments.

Additional information

grade-level

3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade

subject

Social Studies, High-Interest Reading

State Educational Standards

LB.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.2, LB.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.4, NCSS.D2.ECO.6.3–5

Lessons are aligned to meet the education objectives and goals of most states. For more information on your state objectives, contact your local Board of Education or Department of Education in your state.