Multiplication of Larger Numbers

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Our Multiplication of Larger Numbers lesson plan teaches students methods for multiplying multi-digit whole numbers. Students also solve practice problems using the strategies taught in this lesson.

Included with this lesson are some adjustments or additions that you can make if you’d like, found in the “Options for Lesson” section of the Classroom Procedure page. One of the optional additions to this lesson is to hide cards with numbers on them around your classroom and have your students find them and multiply them together.

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Description

What our Multiplication of Larger Numbers lesson plan includes

Lesson Objectives and Overview: Multiplication of Larger Numbers provides students with the specific steps and strategies needed to multiply large numbers. We call these steps an algorithm because we follow them each time we solve a large multiplication problem. The steps are presented in the lesson with examples so students can follow along and then practice using the steps. At the end of the lesson, students will be able to fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm. This lesson is for students in 4th grade, 5th grade, and 6th grade.

Classroom Procedure

Every lesson plan provides you with a classroom procedure page that outlines a step-by-step guide to follow. You do not have to follow the guide exactly. The guide helps you organize the lesson and details when to hand out worksheets. It also lists information in the orange box that you might find useful. You will find the lesson objectives, state standards, and number of class sessions the lesson should take to complete in this area. In addition, it describes the supplies you will need as well as what and how you need to prepare beforehand. The only materials you need for this lesson are the handouts. To prepare for this lesson ahead of time, you can copy the handouts and cut out cards for the grab bag for the activity worksheet.

Options for Lesson

Included with this lesson is an “Options for Lesson” section that lists a number of suggestions for activities to add to the lesson or substitutions for the ones already in the lesson. The first suggested addition to the lesson is to have students cut out their own set of numbers to place into a bag, which they will draw from the bag two at a time and multiply. You can also have students glue the numbers from their grab bags onto a piece of paper first. Another fun activity would be to hide cards with numbers on them around your classroom and have students find them and multiply them together. Finally, you could have your students roll a dice and multiply the numbers together.

Teacher Notes

The teacher notes page includes lines that you can use to add your own notes as you’re preparing for this lesson.

MULTIPLICATION OF LARGER NUMBERS LESSON PLAN CONTENT PAGES

The Multiplication of Larger Numbers lesson plan includes two content pages. The lesson begins with an explanation of the standard multiplication algorithm. It states that you have to follow specific steps to multiply large numbers, and that we call these steps an algorithm because we follow them every time we multiply. Each step is listed in the lesson along with examples so students can more easily understand the steps they need to follow.

The first step is to write the numbers with the largest number of digits on top of the second number, making sure to line up the last digit of each. If both numbers have the same number of digits, you can put either one on top. The order does not matter due to the commutative property. We call the top number the multiplicand, the lower number the multiplier, and the answer the product. The lesson includes some helpful examples.

The second step is to multiply the top number by the ones place of the bottom number. For example, if multiplying 92 x 17, you would first multiply 92 by 7. You write the product under the line, making sure to keep the numbers lined up.

The third step is to multiply the top number by the bottom number’s tens place, first writing a zero in the ones place on the next line. The fourth and final step is to add the rows together to get the final product. The lesson then includes another example of using this method to find the product of two large numbers.

MULTIPLICATION OF LARGER NUMBERS LESSON PLAN WORKSHEETS

The Multiplication of Larger Numbers lesson plan includes four worksheets: an activity worksheet, a practice worksheet, a homework assignment, and a quiz. You can refer to the guide on the classroom procedure page to determine when to hand out each worksheet.

GRAB BAG ACTIVITY WORKSHEET

For the activity worksheet, students will reach into a bag that contains different numbers. They will grab two numbers and find the product. They will continue for the length of the activity.

FIND THE PRODUCT PRACTICE WORKSHEET

For the practice worksheet, students will find the product of six different multiplication problems. They will then solve two word problems where they also have to find the product.

MULTIPLICATION OF LARGER NUMBERS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT

The homework assignment asks students to solve multiplication word problems that use larger numbers.

QUIZ

This lesson plan includes a quiz that students can use to test their knowledge and understanding of the lesson material.

Worksheet Answer Keys

This lesson plan includes answer keys for the practice worksheet, the homework assignment, and the quiz. No answer key is provided for the activity worksheet because each student will draw different numbers from the grab bag. If you choose to administer the lesson pages to your students via PDF, you will need to save a new file that omits these pages. Otherwise, you can simply print out the applicable pages and keep these as reference for yourself when grading assignments.

Additional information

grade-level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

subject

Math

State Educational Standards

LB.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.5, LB.Math.Content.5.NBT.B.5

Lessons are aligned to meet the education objectives and goals of most states. For more information on your state objectives, contact your local Board of Education or Department of Education in your state.